A team of academics and experts published a July 10 blueprint that acts as a template to help communities become “smart cities” by adopting a secure hybrid cloud architecture.

As part of its push towards open data, the City of Chicago published comprehensive data on Transportation Network Providers (TNP) – commonly known as ride-hailing companies – on April 12.






Smart city

St. Petersburg, Fla., was named a Smart Gigabit Community by US Ignite, a non-profit organization that helps accelerate the smart city movement. As a Smart Gigabit Community, St. Petersburg will have access to “a low-latency and ultra-fast network with local cloud computing and storage capabilities.”






San Antonio appointed Brian Dillard as its chief innovation officer earlier this month, a move that would make his interim position in the role permanent.






The EastWest Institute (EWI) on Thursday released a new report to provide guidance on how to make tomorrow’s “smart cities” secure and safe through effective technology management by executives and administrators.






The mayor of Chattanooga, Tenn., pushed back today on the notion that 5G wireless services hold the key for rolling out big “smart-cities” technology improvements, and instead said his city’s gigabit fiber network can handle the job just fine.






Google

In a cease and desist letter sent Saturday, the New York City Police Department (NYPD) demanded that Google stop sharing the location of Driving While Impaired (DWI) checkpoints on its navigation app, Waze. In the letter, signed by department’s acting deputy commissioner for legal matters, Ann P. Prunty, the NYPD explained that under the city’s Vision Zero initiative its trying to eliminate all traffic fatalities and “paramount to the success of this initiative” is the police enforcing all DWI laws.






Aaron Peskin, a member of San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors, has proposed a ban on the city’s agencies from using facial recognition technology. If the ordinance, offered by Peskin on Tuesday, succeeds, San Francisco would be the first U.S. city to ban facial recognition technology.






elections voting vote

A majority of surveyed U.S. information and technology professionals–86 percent–are concerned about the public sector’s ability to conduct secure, reliable, and accurate elections, according to a new study from ISACA released today.






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